British Extended Play Releases

Identification and Price Guide

As is true with the British LP's, Beatles EP's released in England generally came out on a yellow and black Parlophone label. There are several label differences that appear throughout the decade, however, providing the modern Beatles collector with a definitive way of attaching a date to his Beatles EP's.

From the first Beatles EP to nearly their last, Parlophone pressed EP's on a yellow and black label, shown above. It is necessary to examine the details, though, in order to know when the EP actually came out.


Look at the label in more detail. The writing around the rim of the label, called the "rim print," indicates that the record was made by "The Parlophone Co. Ltd.. There is no printed slogan across the middle of the label on this issue.

EP's originally released on this label style
Title Catalog Number Value in NM Condition
Twist and Shout GEP 8882 $50
The Beatles Hits GEP 8880* $125
The Beatles Hits GEP 8880 $50
The Beatles No. 1 GEP 8883 $50

*NOTE1: First pressings of The Beatles Hits accidentally omitted the statement "Recording First Published 1963" from the label.

NOTE2: Although The Beatles Hits has a lower catalog number, its release was held back until September of 1963; Twist and Shout had been issued in July.

NOTE3: There are two "sub-variations" of this label style. The majority of the label print may be found in a Roman style font (with serifs) or in a sans-serif font which normally has thinner letters.

In 1964, legalities forced Parlophone to add a "resale statement" to their records. All Parlophone EP's produced between 1964 and late 1965 will have The Parlophone Co. Ltd. in the rim print and will have the Sold in UK message across the middle of the label.

EP's originally released on this label style
Title Catalog Number Value in NM Condition
All My Loving GEP 8891 $50
Long Tall Sally GEP 8913 $50
Extracts from the film A Hard Day's Night GEP 8920 $75
Extracts from the Album A Hard Day's Night GEP 8924 $80
Beatles For Sale GEP 8931 $60
Beatles For Sale No. 2 GEP 8938 $60

NOTE4: The Long Tall Sally is the first of only two Beatles EP's to feature "new" material, songs that were not previously available as singles or on an LP.

NOTE5: Original copies of the EP, Extracts from the Album... open from the side as most EP's do. Later reissues of the EP open from the top.

From 1965 until 1969, all Parlophone EP's were released with labels having The Gramophone Co. Ltd. in the rim print and the Sold in UK message across the center of the label.

EP's originally released on this label style
Title Catalog Number Value in NM Condition
Million Sellers GEP 8946* $125
Million Sellers GEP 8946* $75
Yesterday GEP 8948 $75
Nowhere Man GEP 8952 $75

*NOTE6: First pressings of the Million Sellers EP show the originally planned title of Beatles' Golden Discs on the label. (See inset photo above table).

The Magical Mystery Tour EP, released in 1967, featured an black and silver label similar to the label used on singles.

Like the other EP's of the period, original copies of Magical Mystery Tour indicate The Gramophone Co. Ltd. in the rim print and have the Sold in UK message across the middle of the label.

It is also worth noting that all EP's produced during the 1960's sported laminated covers. During the 1970's, the lamination was omitted.

EP's originally released on this label style
Title Catalog Number Value in NM Condition
Magical Mystery Tour MMT 1 (mono) $100
Magical Mystery Tour SMMT 1 (stereo) $80

NOTE7: Mono copies of the EP feature alternate mixes of the songs. Since the EP was not reissued in mono, original mono copies of the EP are particularly collectible.

In mid-1969, all of the Beatles Parlophone EP's were reissued onto a label having "The Gramophone Co. Ltd" in the rim print but having NO "Sold in UK" message across the middle of the label. This is commonly called the 70's label, because it lasted through 1976.

At that time, the Beatles Parlophone EP's were again reissued, onto labels mentioning EMI in the rim print. One new EP was made in 1981 to accompany the boxed set called The Beatles EP's Collection (BEP 14). This EP features the first appearance of "Baby You're a Rich Man" in England in stereo. "She's a Woman" also appears on the EP in stereo, where it appears with a count-in. "The Inner Light" makes its first stereo appearance worldwide on this EP. Finally, although the sleeve notes say that "This Boy" is in true stereo on the EP, it actually appears in rechanneled stereo. Value of the set: $125 or more.


A Word About Condition

The condition of a record is all-important as to determining its value. The values shown are drastically reduced for lesser condition copies, as shown below:

Near Mint, or NM, condition records are unscratched. If the label has stickers or tape, this must be noted. Essentially, they look like they just came from the store.

Very Good Plus, or VG+, condition records will have very few scratches. Without close inspection, they might pass for Near Mint copies. A VG+ record normally sells for half what a NM copy goes for.

Very Good, or VG, condition records have a fair amount of scratches, but they by no means appear "beat up". A VG condition record normally sells for one fourth of the NM price.

Very Good Minus, or VG-, condition records are starting to appear quite scratched. Still, when played, they play through, although the surface noise is becoming distracting. Many singles are commonly found in this condition. A VG- condition record normally sells for one sixth of the NM price.

Good, or G, condition records look scratched--basically all over, but they'll play through well enough to enjoy the song. A G condition record sells for one tenth of the NM price. [Some dealers also use a grade of G+, which sells for one eighth of the NM price.]

Fair, or fr, condition records are generally worthless unless the record is rare. They're scratched up and have distracting surface noise, but they're not completely ruined. No chips missing, and not cracked. They sell for one twentieth of the NM price or less.

Poor, or pr, condition records are basically ruined. They may be warped, cracked, chipped, or otherwise unsuitable for collecting. Most collectors only accept poor condition copies of something really rare until a better one comes along. They're virtually worthless.

© 2000 Frank Daniels

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